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Saw It On Social: Givling

When I heard about a trivia game (I love trivia) that paid off people’s student loans, I thought “This is too good to be true.”  Ladies, I was wrong.  (Plus, the game’s really fun.)

Givling is a trivia game app.  The questions are true/false, and the subject matter varies wildly.  Players are teamed up into groups of three, and the team with the highest score divides the daily prize money.  The prize typically varies in size from $150 to $1500, and is determined by the game’s revenue from the previous day.

But Givling isn’t just a fun game.  The creator, Lizbeth, refers to the Givling community as the FFG, the force for good.  And as of today, the combined power of the FFG has paid off the student loans of 14 people.

How Givling works is a little bit complicated, so I’ll give the brief overview.

Lizbeth created Givling as a form of crowd funding to rescue people from loan debt.  There are three ways to have your loan paid off:

  1. The Queue. The line every one of the tens-of-thousands of Givling players is in.  Loans are paid off in order.
  2. The Random Drawing.  Playing games, watching ads, interacting with corporate funders, and buying coins make you eligible for the drawing and earn you queue points.  These QPs are like extra entries into the random drawings that move people from deeper in the queue line up to the front.
  3. Be a Top Funder. Buying coins to play the game funds the student loans of others.  The people who have put in the most money, are moved up in the queue.

The current payoff order alternates between members of The Queue, Random Drawings and Top Funders.  I’ve been watching this happen for months now, and somehow, it works.  Much of the revenue used to pay the loans comes from watching ad videos that run during the game, so the more people who watch/play, the game earns.

Since not everyone’s student loans are the same size, Givling limits your payoff to $50,000.  No student loans?  You can earn $25,000 toward your mortgage.

Now, for my experience.  I started playing Givling over two years ago just because I liked trivia and wanted to see if crowdfunding student loans could work.  It took almost a year to pay off the first loan.  That wait was brutal.  But when people saw that it could work, that brought in more corporate partners and more opportunities for ad revenue. So it only took a few months to pay off the second loan.  Now, we pay off multiple loans every month.  The goal being to generate enough revenue to pay off multiple loans per day.

Givling’s most recent winner Megan with her check.

The more people who sign up, play games, watch ads, patronize the corporate partners, and believe in The FFG, the faster we pay off loans.  It’s pure power in numbers.

So how do I know Givling isn’t a scam? Because I know someone from Montana whose loan was paid off.  I’ve won the daily prize money more than a dozen times (because I love playing the game).  And I’ve seen the news stories touting recent payoffs all across the country.  They really are using these revenues to pay off people’s loans $50k at a time.

But the best part?  You can try out Givling without ever spending a dime.  Download the app, and play your two free daily games.  Watch the ads from corporate partners.  And put your name in the hat to have your loans paid off (or paid down) for just 5-minutes of your effort per day.  Worst thing that happens, you play a game you like for free and watch other people’s loans get paid off.  Yes, it’s possible your loan never gets paid off, but your odds are vastly better than playing the lottery and playing doesn’t have to cost you a dime.

The more people who play, the more loans we pay off.  And the quicker we pay loans off.  We’re currently paying off two loans a month.  If you join us (and invite others to join us), we can be paying off a loan a week, then two, then three, and so on.  The more people in the pool, the more the power of The FFG grows, and the more lives we change.

Come join us.

I earned nothing for this post.  I didn’t even put my invite code in because I want you ladies to sign up for Givling because it’s an awesome way to harness people power to help others, not because there was something in it for me. (I added my invite code in the comments, because it now requires one to sign up.  You can also search #givlingcode to use someone else’s.)  Still Skeptical?  Follow the Givling Facebook page for a few days, it’ll change your mind.

{image found here}

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LEAVE A COMMENT

    32 comments

  1. Chelsea says:

    Hi! I went to go sign up for this and it looks like you are required to put in an invite code. App says “no invite code? search #givlingcode online”. And I speak for myself, but I trust you enough that I’m very happy to use any invite codes you post 🙂

    March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Jessica says:

      It does indeed say that an invite is required (I wonder what the thought behind that is). I also agree with the statement above, you’ve built a great reputation for yourself regarding reviews and honesty so I have no problem using your invite code!

      March 8, 2018/Reply
    • EMILY says:

      AGREED! I THINK YOUR READER GROUP TRUSTS YOU AND IF WE HAVE TO USE AN INVITE CODE ANYWAY, I’D CERTAINLY PREFER FOR IT TO BE YOURS!

      March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Allison says:

      I agree! I’d prefer to use your code!

      March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Nicole says:

      I, too, would like to support you, Belle!

      March 8, 2018/Reply
    • M says:

      Me too!

      March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Alicia says:

      Agree!! 🙂

      March 8, 2018/Reply
    • LTH says:

      Hi – Adding to the chorus to say I, too, would love your invite code. If you’d prefer to send it in DM on insta or another channel, that would be fine too.

      March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Catherine says:

      Echoing everyone above – I don’t know that I would have looked twice had I seen Givling anywhere else, so I have no problem giving you credit.

      March 8, 2018/Reply
      • Elizabeth says:

        Agreed! I’d be happy to use your invite code. 🙂

        March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Belle says:

      So my invite code (I didn’t know you needed one to sign up), is AB456831.

      March 8, 2018/Reply
  2. L says:

    Are you seriously pushing what is essentially a pyramid scheme on your website?

    March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Belle says:

      I don’t agree. This is essentially crowdfunding by other means, and unlike a pyramid scheme, you can join with no financial commitment.

      March 8, 2018/Reply
      • Jess says:

        A pyramid scheme is crowdfunding of the payoffs to the early participants though. It’s called a pyramid scheme because the later participants (as a group) fund the returns received by the earlier participants and you need more and more participants in order to pay the returns earned by each additional layer of players. Calling it crowdfunding does not change the nature of the game.

        March 8, 2018/Reply
        • Belle says:

          1) A pyramid “scheme” implies that the funding mechanism is being hidden, no one running a scheme is telling the people at the top their money comes solely from people at the bottom. Also, the money to pay off these loans mostly comes from ad revenues…

          2) Givling’s stated goal is to be able to earn the money to pay off these loans through advertising and partnerships. If interacting with ads, watching videos, etc. pays off loans, I don’t see that as being any different than using Google Adsense or Youtube video ads to pay to consume content. If the game only used ad revenue to generate the money, would you still feel it was a scheme? Or that someone was simple using the power of group advertising to do some good?

          3) I’ve found the Givling folks to be transparent, and doing their best to create a platform that is fair. If you don’t want to participate, of course you don’t have to, but if you can pay off other people’s loans and have a shot at paying off your own simply by watching a couple of ads every day and playing two free trivia games (which are pretty fun), how is that harmful?

          I’ve bought in. You don’t have to. But if your consuming it for free or enjoy playing the game enough to buy a few coins (which is no different than putting money into Candy Crush), I don’t see the harm.

          March 8, 2018/Reply
    • Kate says:

      I think of this more like the lottery. Everyone who’s buying the $2 Powerball isn’t going to win, you play for a chance. If I can get 1 in a 100,000 odds (or whatever it comes out to) of getting some money towards my college debt, that’s worth the Metro ride I spent playing.

      March 8, 2018/Reply
  3. Liz says:

    My invite code is E752802 if anyone wants to use it! I am excited to give this a shot! Thanks for highlighting it!

    March 8, 2018/Reply
  4. Tai says:

    I too would like to use your invite code.

    March 8, 2018/Reply
  5. Amanda says:

    This is an exciting idea. I would also like to use your invite code. Thanks for sharing this!

    March 8, 2018/Reply
  6. Sierra Delta says:

    Add me to the list of people who’d like the invite code! I’d love to see the shock on my husband’s face if I could help pay down our mortgage — I babysit for our granddaughters, and my compensation is mainly sticky kisses. . .

    March 8, 2018/Reply
  7. Jennifer says:

    I would like to use your invite code to join, rather than one found on the internet.

    March 8, 2018/Reply
  8. Meghan says:

    Add me to the queue for your invite code! Thanks for always providing your readers with interesting, cool content. We appreciate you!

    March 8, 2018/Reply
  9. Naomi says:

    Oh! This just inspired me to re-download the app…I’d deleted it after forgetting my password (just never got around to re-setting it, and it fell victim to one of my app purges).

    Thanks for writing this!

    March 9, 2018/Reply
  10. mia says:

    I thought your blog had been taken over for a minute, seemed such an unlikely post from you and left a bad feeling. It seems it’s not e con HOWEVER http://www.loanlab.co/will-givling-help-you-to-pay-back-your-student-loans/

    March 9, 2018/Reply
    • Belle says:

      Nope, not a con. Just a game I enjoy that may do some real good.

      March 10, 2018/Reply
    • Adam says:

      FYI – some of that information in the LoanLab link is incorrect/out of date. It’s actually 75% (not 65%) of the funding that goes toward loan payoffs, 15% (not 25%) that goes toward the Daily Trivia Prize.

      As for who gets their loans paid – 50% are chosen in random drawings. 25% are High Funders, and another 25% are paid off in the order they joined.

      There is a $250.00/week limit on how much you can fund the Queue on your own and set yourself up to earn a spot in the Queue that way. While this does tend to favor people who can afford to spend $1,000/month funding the Queue, as the rate of payoffs increase, that will mitigate that advantage.

      March 13, 2018/Reply
  11. nr says:

    I’ve read and re-read the paragraph about your experience and I want to make sure I’m clear: You, personally, have not had a loan paid off yet through this program, right? I was confused by the bit about the wait for the first loan to be paid off being brutal and then the piece about the second loan getting paid off a few months later. This is the experience of the company, right? Fascinating idea. Thanks for sharing.

    March 12, 2018/Reply
    • J says:

      This is what has been really sitting with me for the past few days after reading this post, and something that is really surprising to me coming from this blog. It’s unclear which part of this you, Abra, wrote, and which part was written by the company, presumably to promote this game. While I understand that you play this game and enjoy it, the way that this post is presented really seems to cut against some of the values that you espouse about not blindly promoting or being sponsored by brands.

      March 12, 2018/Reply
      • Belle says:

        None of it is written by the company, only me.

        I often recommend products and services on this blog that I’ve used. I’ve been playing this game for a couple of years, and it seems that it’s reaching a critical place where loans are being paid off, companies are taking an interest in sponsoring loan payoffs, and the ad revenues are growing. I enjoy playing the trivia part of the game, and I thought there might be other readers who would enjoy that as well, even if they didn’t want to commit money or believe in the overarching idea.

        March 12, 2018/Reply
    • Belle says:

      No, I have not won the student loan payoff. I have one the daily trivia prize several times.

      Givling had to build up to a place where enough people were watching the ads to pay off the first loan, that took some time. Then, the press from that payoff brought more people in and brought in corporate sponsors, so now the loans are being paid off much faster.

      March 12, 2018/Reply
  12. Nancy says:

    I signed up last week and it looks like the game is significantly changing! The random drawing is going away, the top funder list is locked and will be funded alternating with the queue, but that will change as well–to a queue based solely on funding status. Newcomers, like me, will play for the new weekly trivia prize. There are now 3 ads per hour you can watch, and they get the most ad revenue if you click all the way to the app store. Turns out if all 25,000 active users fully clicked on the ads in the past, they could have funded almost a loan per week.

    March 19, 2018/Reply
    • Belle says:

      I know. I’m interested to see what happens. I think this could be really good. Though people seem concerned that they’re not good enough at trivia.

      March 19, 2018/Reply